Jan 262011
 

The most important aspect of organizing a collection of digitized photographs and documents is the naming convention used to reference each item.

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Nov 012010
 

It is increasingly easy to obtain digital images of evidence used in genealogical research. More online databases now provide images of actual records. It is also easy to scan photographs and documents, or even record them using a digital camera.

I have already begun the process of digitizing the genealogical evidence I accumulated over the years. In the forthcoming series of blog posts entitled “Digital Evidence,” I will describe the system I use to generate, manage and display my collection.

As always, comments and feedback are welcome, especially if you have a better idea!

Jun 032010
 

While in Florida recently, I was delighted to finally meet Betty-Jane, my third-cousin, once removed. We are both descended from Hubert Yuncker and Barbe Gossé who emigrated from Kirrberg in the Alsace region of France in 1847.

Betty-Jane and Mike

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Jun 032010
 

I was recently contacted by a previously unknown fifth cousin, Andrea, from Bremen, Germany. We share fourth great-grandparents, Peter Joseph Mauren and Anna Maria Minwegen. Her branch of the family remained in Germany while my third great-grandparents emigrated to America in 1840.

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Oct 292009
 

I’ve been researching my genealogy seriously for about ten years now. Earlier this year I applied for a “First Families” certificate during the 150th anniversary celebration of Isabella County, Michigan. This is a certificate presented to descendants of pioneer families who settled in the county prior to 1899. Little did I realize how much effort that application would require.

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Mar 252009
 

At a recent funeral, the pastor read a touching poem. I was so impressed with it that I found the author’s website and learned it was written over ten years ago. It has since gained some popularity and I thought it was appropriate for genealogists, who are so concerned with the birth and death dates of our ancestors.

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Sep 122007
 

Hamburg, Germany was a major port of embarkation for emigrants bound for America during the nineteenth century. Since the Germans are good record keepers, detailed records were undoubtedly kept about these emigrants, our ancestors. My grandmother Ida Pohl was a little girl when she emigrated with her mother and siblings from Hamburg in 1893. As an amateur genealogist, I was frustrated to learn that most of these records were destroyed by British and American bombers during World War II.

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May 262007
 

I researched marriage records from the villages of Baerendorf and Kirrberg in the Alsace region of France, during the period from 1600 through 1800. I found that men usually married women from surrounding villages, and the wedding usually took place in the bride’s hometown. The groom usually moved to the bride’s village and they began their families there.

May 252007
 

It is helpful to use a numbering scheme when referring to the ancestral families in your family tree. Referring to a family by the names of the spouses is problematic. Their names might change as new information about them is discovered. A number is also easier to reference in a filing scheme for paper documents or index cards, as well as for computer files and Internet web pages.

Here is a method for numbering families (not individuals) for your direct-line ancestry. First, notice that an ancestor or pedigree chart is actually a “binary tree,” meaning that each node, or family, in the tree always has exactly two ancestor nodes. Each of the two nodes can therefore be assigned a unique number. This includes even the “missing” nodes, or families that you have yet to discover.

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Apr 192007
 

I’m searching for ancestors of my great-grandfather Joseph Voisin (1858-1916). I have hit a brick wall in tracing Joseph’s ancestors to Ontario, Canada.

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