The Voisin/Stewart Family
divider

Family Gallery

Husband: John Ernest Yuncker
Born: 16 February 1881 in Riley Township, Clinton, Michigan 1
Married: 06 August 1910 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 44
Died: 02 November 1962 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 36
Father: Jacob P. Yuncker
Mother: Anna Margaret "Maggie" Pohl
Spouses:

Gallery

00224.jpg
John Ernest Yuncker
About 1923
Wife: Bessie Zander
Born: 14 January 1888 in Caro, Tuscola, Michigan
Died: 02 December 1962 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:

Gallery

Additional Information

John Ernest Yuncker:

Occupation: 1903, Musical Instrument Industry 2

Occupation: About 1909, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Sherman, Clay & Company 3

Occupation: 1910, Salesman, Piano House

Occupation: About 1910, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Wiley B. Allen Company 4

Occupation: FROM 1911 TO 1928, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Fitzgerald Music Company 5

Article: 13 May 1914, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; Want Ad, See Mr. Yuncker 6

Transcription:

ONE of the oldest and most dignified concerns in the city contemplates adding two more men to its sales force. Applicants must be of high moral character Will pay salary or straight commission. Call forenoons. Ask for Mr. Yuncker or Mr. Dow. 947 S. Broadway.

Article: FROM 23 February 1915 TO 21 April 1915, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; House For Sale 7

Here, John Yuncker placed advertisements to sell his house and personal property at a loss over several weeks in early 1915. He needed the money to settle a debt. He had probably been working for the Fitzgerald Music Company since 1911. It was a private company until it was incorporated as a public company in 1919. It is possible this debt was associated somehow with the Fitzgerald Music Company, given that he was a principal shareholder when it eventually incorporated.

Partial Transcriptions:

FOR SALE--Must dispose of my house in southwest on Grammercy place at once; will give my equity, $1500, less than it cost me; must have $2000 cash and will let place go for $4100. This is full furnished, including piano, rugs, ornaments, etc.; everything goes. One and a half stories, sewer in, large lot. Fruit trees; only 1 block from car line. Fine for an investment or home; can be rented all the time; must make quick deal; no dealers; no trade. See OWNER, 949 S. Broadway. MR. YUNCKER.

FOR SALE--Will lose $1500 in actual cash on this place, fine location in southwest, fruit trees, east front, 1-1/2 stories, fully furnished, everything goes including piano, rugs, ornaments, etc. Place cost me $5600 with furnishings, will let go for $4100, $2000 cash. Must sell to meet debt. See OWNER. 951 SO. BDWY. MR. YUNCKER.

Article: 09 September 1916, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Returns from vacation 8

Transcription:

John E. Yuncker, sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., and Mrs. Yuncker, returned last week from a two weeks' visit to San Diego. Mr. Yuncker also made a short study of the duties of the blood-thirsty bull-fighter, at Tiajuana, Mex.

Article: 24 February 1917, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Southwest Contractor; Plumbing work 9

Transcription:

Plumbing Permits
2337--Wm. Awburn, 1 fix; J. E. Yuncker, 4915 S. Gramercy Pl.

Article: 03 March 1917, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Southwest Contractor; Porch and Garage work 10

Transcription:

Building Permits
Los Angeles
1185-86--Add Cement and Stone Porch and Build Garage, 18x18 ft. 4915 Gramercy Place; John E. Yuncker, own, at lot (79776); day work; $125 and $85; total $210.

Article: 17 September 1917, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Auto Accident 11

Transcription:

J. E. Yuncker in Auto Accident

J. E. Yuncker, manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., while on his summer vacation near Santa Barbara, had a very narrow escape from injury in an automobile accident about ten days ago, which it is not likely that either he or Mrs. Yuncker, who was with him, will soon forget. Driving their new Scripps-Boothe roadster along a narrow stretch of the roadway north of Santa Barbara, one of the front wheels slipped over the edge of a steep embankment, and only a heavy growth of trees and brush kept the car from falling and rolling to the bottom several feet below. The car left the roadway entirely, and, turned on its side, was supported in mid-air solely by the foliage. Neither of them injured in the least degree, Mr. and Mrs. Yuncker succeeded in extricating themselves without assistance, and later the car was rescued without damage.

Article: 03 June 1918, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; Melodious Tune 12

Transciption:

Melodious Tune of Chanticleer Attacked

Chanticleer was the objective of a surprise attack in the city council today.

Before the attack ended, it had debauched over a field that included barking dogs, squawking parrots and howling cats.

It all had to do with the complaint of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Yuncker, 4911 Gramercy, that a neighbor maintained the following birds and animals to the detriment of the Yuncker family's peace of mind and repose.

One Rooster

One loud-crowing rooster.
One un-melodious cat that chooses 5 a.m. for a back-fence concert.
One over-talkative parrot that squawks all day long.
One dog and two pups that contribute barkings and yelpings.

'It's a Shame'

Councilman True appeared for the complainants. "It's a shame," said the councilman, "that this rooster, the dogs and cats and parrot are allowed to so disturb the neighborhood. I want to know if something cannot be done about it. I want to know what the city prosecutor can do about it."

City Prosecutor Widney said that the present ordinance prohibited roosters or chickens being maintained within 25 feet of a residence building, and provided also against uncleanliness in chicken yards.

True contended there were few nuisances like a crowing rooster in the early morning when one tries to sleep. "What about barking dogs?" asked Councilman Mallard. "Well, I've heard people complain even about children," said President Farmer, "and I don't think we ought to waste the council's time with subjects like these."

Prosecutor Widney said he usually got results by asking owners of roosters to guillotine them. "And they generally do it," he added. So, pending whatever other [action] the city council might care to take, the complainants were advised to tell their complaint to Prosecutor Widney and seek results from that [source.]

Draft Registration: 12 September 1918, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 13

Occupation: 12 September 1918, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; General Manager, Fitzgerald Music Company 14

Article: 15 February 1919, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Business is good 15

Transcription:

Best January Business in Four Years

John E. Yuncker, general sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., says his company in the month just closed did the biggest January business in four years. He also states that the month's business in pianos and players yielded approximately 45 per cent. cash, which he considers an especially gratifying feature of the record.

Article: 26 July 1919, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Fitzgerald Music Company incorporates 16

Transcription:

New Los Angeles Incorporation

The Fitzgerald Music Co. has been incorporated in Los Angeles, Cal., for $100,000 by J. T. Fitzgerald, H. C. Braden and J. E. Yuncker.

Article: 02 August 1919, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Fitzgerald Music Company incorporates 17

Transcription:

Fitzgerald Music Co. Incorporates

The Fitzgerald Music Co., heretofore privately owned by J. T. Fitzgerald, was incorporated the early part of this month, with a capital stock of $100,000. The incorporators are J. T. Fitzgerald, H. C. Braden and J. E. Yuncker, with Mr. Fitzgerald as president. The company, now located at 727 South Hill street, was established about twenty-eight years ago, and has grown to be one of the leading music houses of this city. It represents the Knabe, Knabe-Ampico, Mehlin, Haines Bros., Behr Bros., Franklin and Brewster lines of pianos and players and the Edison phonographs and records.

Article: 01 September 1919, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; Charters Plane 18

Transcription:

Charters Plane, Flies North to Keep Appointment

John Yuncker, sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., chartered an airplane from the [Syd] Chaplin Aircraft corporation and flew to Santa Barbara to see Frank Touhten, a prospective customer. Yuncker was given a limited time to reach Santa Barbara, as Touhten had an appointment which took mim away from home for a few days.

Yuncker immediately engaged the airplane and kept the appointment. Touhten bought a Knabe Ampico and, as far as is know, this is the first instrument of its kind sold by airplane.

Article: 04 September 1919, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; Advertisement for Fitzgerald Music Company 19

Partial Transcription:

Upon the wings of Science's mighty creature of the heavens flew the fleet tidings-bearer of another "wonder of the century"

Like some fabled rider of sunbeams, bursting from the clouds, there alighted in Santa Barbara on Saturday morning a messenger bearing tidings of that musical marvel which has brought sunshine into many hearts. He carried the tidings of that which has thrilled the musical world--that which some have called a "miracle"-- he bore the wondrous story of the Knabe Ampico Reproducing Piano

His was an errand that could not wait for strike-blocked trains.

No train, nor the fastest auto, could make the trip to Santa Barbara and back in the time required to fulfill his mission.

Confronted by the necessity of being in two places almost at the same instant--in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles--last Saturday morning, the salesmanager of the Fitzgerald Music Company, summoned by those eager to know the "miracle piano," solved the problem in a way that establishes a new record in business methods--that blazes a new trail for commerce across the trackless course of the heavens; he leaped into a winged argonaut of the winds, and was hurdling the clouds for Santa Barbara, arriving there before the first train out of Los Angeles had labored its way to the city's outskirts.

His story was quickly told, a contract was signed for the immediate delivery of a splendid $3300 Knabe Ampico Reproducing Piano to Frank Tuhten, wealthy real estate operator of Santa Barbara; and back, through winds, fogs, clouds and rain he sped to Los Angeles in time for a second big transaction shortly after noon.

[Caption:] H. C. Braden (right), general manager of Fitzgerald Music Co., speeding John E. Yuncker, salesmanager, on his history-making trip by airplane to Santa Barbara--the first trip of this kind ever made.

Article: 20 September 1919, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Travels 200 Miles in Air 20

Transcription:

TRAVELS 200 MILES IN AIR TO CLOSE AMPICO SALE

John E. Yuncker, Sales Manager of Fitzgerald Music Co., Los Angeles, Uses Airplane to Call on and Sell Prospect in Santa Barbara During Recent Railroad Strike

LOS ANGELES, CAL., September 12.—New uses for the airplane in the business world are constantly being found, but it is believed that John E Yuncker, sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., this city, is the first piano man to use the airplane for carrying him to a prospect in order to close a sale. Incidentally Mr. Yuncker's progressiveness won for him a signed order for a $3,300 Knabe Ampico reproducing piano.

During the recent railroad strike Mr. Yuncker received a request from Frank Tuhten, a wealthy real estate operator from Santa Barbara, for some details regarding the Knabe Ampico. Faced with the uncertainty of train service and the necessity of taking as little time as possible from his work at headquarters here Mr. Yuncker conceived the idea of traveling by airplane, with the result that he was in Santa Barbara and talking to the prospect before the first train had left Los Angeles.

The distance between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara in an airline is about 100 miles, yet Mr. Yuncker made the round trip and sold a piano in each city before noon. The successful carrying out of the project was due to the enterprise and ingenuity of H. C. Braden, vice-president and genera! manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co.

Not only did the unusual stunt serve to bring in the order for the Knabe Ampico, but it offered the Fitzgerald Music Co. the opportunity for some unusually striking publicity, of which full advantage was taken. Full-page advertisements were run in the local papers, showing pictures of Mr. Yuncker about to start on his unique trip and calling attention to the importance of the occasion through the medium of well-conceived text.

Article: 20 September 1919, New York, New York; Piano Salesman Makes 'Plane Trip; The Music Trades 21

Transcription:

Piano Salesman Makes 'Plane Trip to Call on a Good Prospect

Railroad Strike Precluded Train Journey, but J. E. Yuncker Made Hundred-Mile Flight to Close an Order

LOS ANGELES, CAL., Sept. 15.--Not to be denied a possible sale by a thing so insignificant as a railroad strike, John E. Yuncker, piano sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co. of this city, is here shown in the act of calling on a "prospect" by airplane. Chartering one the flying steeds from the Syd Chaplin Aircraft Corporation here, he flew to Santa Barbara, Cal., a distance of one hundred miles, interviewed his man, closed a sale for a $3,050 Knabe-Ampico reproducing piano, and, returning inthe same manner, was back at the Los Angeles store in exactly four and a half hours from the time he stared. The sale was made to Frank Tuhten, a Santa Barbara real estate man. Learning that Mr. Tuhten was in the market for a good piano, Mr. Yuncker was determined to have a face-to-face talk with the man on the subject of the Knabe-Ampico. The passenger trains out of this city were tied up at that time by a strike, but, of course, he could make the trip by automobile. Some other piano man, however, might have heard of the "prospect," and might also think of making a hundred-mile motor trip. Therefore, why not be certain of beating the possible "other fellow" by using a more up-to-date conveyance, an airship?

Mr. Yuncker left Los Angeles at exactly 10.30 in the morning and was landed in Santa Barbara at 11.45. He spent approximately two hours with Mr. Tuhten, and, leaving on the homeward trip at 2 p.m., was back in Los Angeles at 3 o'clock, with the contract for a Knabe-Ampico signed and in his pocket.

[Caption:] H. C. Braden, J. E. Yuncker, B. Traub and Lieut. Vance

Occupation: 1920, Salesman, Music House

Article: 12 January 1921, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Evening Herald; Company Bonus 22

Transcription:

Music Co. Has Feast and Bonus Division

Distributing over $10,000 as a liberal percentage of the fiscal year's net earnings among its 60 [employees], the Fitzgerald Music Co. entertained its entire organization at a banquet in the Egan theater building last evening. Following talks by J. T. Fitzgerald, president of the company; H. C. Braden, vice president and general manager, and J. E. Yuncker, secretary and sales manager, in which all three voiced sentiments of the greatest optimism for the business outlook in 1921, envelopes containing checks were distributed. In the course of his address Mr. Fitzgerald expressed the utmost confidence in the business future not only of his own firm but of the entire business world.

Article: 29 April 1922, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Impresario 23

Transcription:

Knabe President in Los Angeles

R. K. Paynter, the president of William Knabe & Co., was here last week. A wonderful dinner was given by J. T. Fitzgerald, president of the Fitzgerald Music Co., at his private home, and was attended by Mr. Paynter and the various members of the Fitzgerald Music Co. About thirty guests in all sat down to dinner and an interesting speech was made by Mr. Paynter. Entertainment, consisting of musical numbers and recitations by members of the Fitzgerald Music Co., where given under the impresarioship of Sales Manager Yuncker, and it was declared by the audience that the diversified program given would at any time equal an evening's entertainment at the best vaudeville theater anywhere.

Article: 12 August 1922, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Burglary 24

Transcription:

Fitzgerald's Sales Manager Robbed

John Yuncker, sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., suffered severe losses in the shape of clothing, jewelry and other personal belongings when his house was recently broken into by burglars. Mr. Yunkcer, accompanied by Mrs. Yuncker, had left for San Diego and had nearly reached that city, when Mrs. Yuncker declared that she had a strange premonition that something was wrong at their Los Angeles home. So insistent did she become that it was finally decided to turn back at this point, although they were almost within sight of their destination. They arrived back in time to disturb a gang of burglars who, although they had already secured a quantity of booty, made off at their approach and unfortunately effected their escape.

Article: 25 August 1923, Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Presto; Photograph, Fitzgerald Music Company 25

Transcription:

"It Can Be Done" as Trade Slogan

Fitzgerald Music Company, of Los Angeles, Proves That the Summer Months May Be the Greatest of the Whole Year.

Phenomenal Piano Record

Instructive Story Tells How the Staff of Active Piano Salesmen Produced Big Business

Taking "It Can Be Done" as their slogan, the piano department of the Fitzgerald Music Company, of Los Angeles, has proven that there is no such thing as a slack season during the summer vacation period, except as it exists in the imagination of men who allow this idea to put the brakes on their own efforts.

This organization has just completed the biggest month's business in its entire 31 years' history, outdistancing even the greatest months' record made during the phenomenal year of 1920, when all business was at its peak of activity, according to an announcement just made by H. C. Braden, vice-president and general manager of the Los Angeles company.

"I believe," said Mr. Braden, "that the phenomenal record made by our organization during July reflects the generally sound, healthy condition of the present time, and the fact that the average family has the money to pay for the better things they desire."

No Slack Season.

J. E. Yuncker, secretary and sales-manager, declared: "I have always been convinced that the so-called slack months of the summer vacation season could be made just as active as any other months of the year--in fact, actually better--if the right efforts and thought were put into the work--if the men would just rid themselves of the notion that there was no use trying in the summer time.

"I decided to demonstrate this fact to our men, and called the entire organization together for a talk on the subject, one Monday morning at the beginning of the month. We devoted the entire morning to the discussion, and I told our men that we were going to set out to make July not only as good as any other month of the year, but that we were going to make it the biggest month in the entire history of the house. When we analyzed the situation and exchanged ideas, everybody agreed that there was really no sound reason after all why the demand for music should not be as active in the summer time as at any other, and why our sincere efforts to provide people with that which they sought should not be as resultful.

"In fact, I proved to our men that this so-called slack season offered even greater opportunities than at any other time, if we were alert and earnest--and for the very reason that competition was reduced to the minimum--other houses, affected by the false notion that effort was useless in summer, neglecting their prospects, and leaving the door wide open to us. The men grasped this idea and entered into it with vigor."

No Forced Drives.

"We did not resort to any special sales, reduced prices, bonuses, special inducements or forced drives. There was merely an intensified effort to tell the truth about our products, to attain a greater fulfillment of our mission of real service, so that those seeking music could select the instruments they desired with economy and advantage.

"For many years the word sale, and all that it means in the strictest sense, has been absolutely stricken from the lexicon of the Fitzgerald Music Company organization. It may seem strange to say that we do not sanction 'selling' in our organization, but that is exactly the case. In other words, we cash in on the theory that reward inheres in real sacrifice.

"J. T. Fitzgerald, the founder and present head of the house, resolved early in the history of his institution to abandon all the commonly accepted rules of so-called scientific salesmanship; to cease trying to 'sell' something, and to reverse the principle of seeking rather to give, to serve, to supply the needs of his clientele."

An Instructive Formula.

In explaining this principle on which his house operates, Mr. Fitzgerald declared:

"I used to study scientific salesmanship and became quite proficient in 'handling' people, but this soon became distasteful to me. The fact that I could worm my way into the mental realm of a 'prospect' and practically compel him to think my way and do my will, thus interfering with his freedom, did not appeal to me as being fair. Today I tell my people never to sell anything to anybody. Let them buy, if they will, and when they will, but we have no 'salesmen' in the generally accepted sense of that term."

"We have found that, no matter how nice one is to a prospective customer, if the least selfish motive creeps in, the customer feels it and puts up a resistance that is unpleasant and that is profitable to no one concerned. Moteives 'get across' quicker than spoken words."

"It is gratifying to know that the bug-a-boo of mesmeric thought and temperamental tendencies manifested in pessimism, fear and lethargy concerning summer inaction in business, has been understandingly rooted out of the mentality of this organization for period named at least."

Sold High-Priced Pianos.

An interesting feature of the great record just made by the Fitzgerald organization was the fact that a larger number of high-priced instruments were in demand than ever before, and that, while there have been single days in which greater records have been made than in any one day during the month of July, the regular daily average was higher, and the total volume for the month in dollars and cents has never been equalled.

In analyzing the reasons for the remarkable results accomplished during July, J. E. Yuncker said:

"For one thing, we have what we believe is the piano organization par excellence. All our men are filled with a love of their work, an interest and stimulus that springs only from the conviction that they are really rendering a helpful, profitable service to our patrons. Furthermore, we believe in recognizing ability and effort to its full value and our standards of compensation are, we believe, the highest existing in any retail piano house in the country. In this way we are able to obtain the services of the high type of men we wish to represent us.

"I think nothing more clearly indicates the high degree of ability possessed by our men than the fact that in all transactions closed during the month of July, not one term payment contract extended over a period of twenty-four months. In common with all piano houses, we allow the usual thirty months when desired, but we regard it as greatly to the advantage of both dealer and patron if this length of time can be reduced. I, therefore, feel that the achievement of our organization in this respect is particularly worthy."

Some of the men responsible for the Fitzgerald Music Company's big July record are B. E. Lang, R. R. Pittenger, Wm. G. Woodward, J. A. Yoest, Coulter Jones, F. W. Nubling, G. P. Widney, C. C. Boler, L. C. Hathaway, Roy Weldon, Victor Anderson and B. F. Driver.

Officers and Piano Men of the Fitzgerald Music Co.

Seated from left to right: J. E. Yuncker, Secretary; J. T. Fitzgerald, President; H. C. Braden, General Manager.

Standing from left to right: G. P. Widney, Wm G. Woodward, C. Jones, B. E. Lang, Roy Weldon, C. C. Boler, B. F. Driver, F. W. Nubling, V. Anderson, R. R. Pittenger, L. C. Hathaway, J. A. Yoest.

Article: 24 October 1925, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Sales Meeting 26

Partial Transcription:

Fred Colber, general representative of the William Knabe & Co., recently addressed the sales force of the Fitzgerald Co., of Los Angeles, and its southern California dealers. J. T. Fitzgerald, president, acclaimed this meeting one of the most enthusiastic and inspiring ever held by his organization.

[...]

John Yuncker, secretary and sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., stated: "Mr. Colber's work with our organization has brought to us just the thing we have needed, because his ideas coincide with those we have practiced ourselves for many years. And coming to our salesmen from such an inspiring source as Mr. Colber, expressed in his sincere, forceful way, it left an impression which will be felt for many years to come and never will be entirely forgotten."

Article: 27 March 1926, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Braden dies, Yuncker appointed vice-president 27

Transcription:

Harry C. Braden Dies After Brief Illness

Vice-President and General Manager of Fitzgerald Music Co., Los Angeles, Passes Away in Height of His Business Career

Los Angeles, Cal., March 19.--Harry Campbell Braden, vice-president and general manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., this city, died at his home in Glendale, Cal., on Saturday last after a brief illness.

Mr. Braden, who was still in his thirties, had through his energy and integrity developed into one of the outstanding figures in the Pacific Coast trade. He had been connected with the Fitzgerald Music Co. for seventeen years and under the able direction of James T. Fitzgerald, president of the company, has made steady progress until he reached the post of general manager.

In the formal announcement of Mr. Braden's death, the Fitzgerald Co. paid high tribute to those qualities which not only made him successful in business, but won the admiration of those with whom he was associated in business. He was active in association work, and local organizations will miss his help greatly as well as his constructive work.

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fitzgerald Music Co., J. E. Yuncker was elected vice-president and treasurer to succeed Mr. Braden and will fill these offices in addition to his position of general sales manager. Charleston Dow was elected secretary of the company, and T. V. Anderson, manager of the wholesale division, will assist in the management and take care of a number of administration details.

Article: 26 June 1926, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Piano contest 28

It is John E. Yuncker who appears to be standing, back row, left, in an accompanying photograph.

Partial Transcription:

Fitzgerald Music Co., Los Angeles, Holds Is Annual Piano Playing Contest

[...]

John E. Yuncker, vice-president of the Ftizgerald Music Co., presented these five ladies to the judges and announced Miss Kaye to be the winner, requesting the latter to address the former and point out to them where they had been specially successful or otherwise. Mr. Altschuler, the celebrated Russian Symphony Orchestra Conductor, stated that he had been a judge in last year's contest and that he was gratified to be able to state that this year's performances had shown a higher standard than ever and he congratulated the Fitzgerald Music Co. upon their wonderful enterprise in encouraging students in such a substantial manner.

Article: 08 January 1927, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Advertisements highlighted 29

Partial Transcription:

Music Is Basis of Fitzgerald Advertising

Los Angeles Piano Merchant Sells Its Instruments Not as So Much Merchandise, but as Mediums of Expression, With the Result That It Stands in the Position That It Does Today

[...]

J. E. Yuncker, general sales manager and vice-president of the Fitzgerald Music Co., states that other series of advertisements similar to the ones shown will appear in the future as in the past. He declared that music teachers have expressed their great appreciation for the high-class propaganda which this advertising conveys on behalf of their profession.

[Accompanied by pictures of Fitzgerald advertisements.]

Article: 28 December 1928, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Resigns from Fitzgerald Music 30

Transcription:

John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.

Los Angeles, Cal., December 1.--John E. Yuncker, vice-president and general sales manager of the Fitzgerald Music Co., resigned his position early this week.

Mr. Yuncker, who is still a comparatively young man, has been in the piano business for the past twenty-five years. His first experience was gained in the East, after which he moved to the Coast and joined the sales force of Sherman, Clay & Co., in San Francisco, and later was with the Wiley B. Allen Co., in Los Angeles. For the past seventeen years, however, he has been with the Fitzgerald Music Co., in the ranks of which he rapidly rose. He was very closely associated with the late Harry C. Braden, general manager, and occupied the position of sales manager, then, up to the time of his resignation. He had a great deal to do with the shaping of the high-class and extensive advertising for which his house was famous, and supervised it entirely after the death of Mr. Braden.

Mr. Yuncker has not announced his future plans and is taking a short, well-earned rest at home.

Occupation: 1930, Music, Piano Instructor

Article: June 1930, New York, New York; Music Trade Review; Advertisement, Yuncker Music Company 31

Partial Transcription:

Plan to See the Bechstein: The Piano of the Masters
[...]
Representatives:
[...]
J. E. Yuncker Music Co., Los Angeles, Calif.

Article: November 1933, New York, New York; Presto-Times; Yuncker Music Company 32

Transcription:

What's Going On In the Trade

The J. E. Yuncker Music Company, 1626 West Seventh street, Los Angeles, Calif., advertises itself as "The Bechstein House," the Bechstein being Yuncker's leader.

Occupation: 1940, Salesman, Piano Store

Occupation: 1942, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Owner, piano store 33

Draft Registration: 26 April 1942, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 34

Artifact: About 1943, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Portion of a receipt showing J. E. Yuncker Music Company 35

Grave Marker: 1962, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California; Hollywood Forever Cemetery 37

Individual Album: 38 39

Bessie Zander:

Occupation: 1930, Teacher, Music

Occupation: 1940, Bookkeeper, Piano Store

Grave Marker: 1962, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California; Hollywood Forever Cemetery 40

Recognition: 27 December 1964, San Pedro, Los Angeles, California; 1499 West 1st Street; Groundbreaking for an American Red Cross Service Center funded by $200,000 bequest of Bessie Yuncker. 41

The bequest of $200,000 in 1964 is equivalent to about $1.5 million today.

Partial Transcription:

Red Cross Will Have New Center

The official groundbreaking of the new American Red Cross Service Center to be constructed on the southeast corner of First Street and Western Avenue in San Pedro was attended by Red Cross volunteers and community and civic leaders from Torrance, Lomita, Wilmington, Palos Verdes, San Pedro, and Gardena....

More than two-thirds of the funds to finance the purchase of the lot, for construction of the new building and furnishings were provided by Bessie Yuncker, who left a substantial bequest in her will. ...

Recognition: 27 October 1965, San Pedro, Los Angeles, California; 1499 West 1st Street; American Red Cross Service Center dedicated to the memory of Bessie Yuncker 42 43

Transcription:

Red Cross Will Dedicate Center

The new home of the Southern District Service Center of the Los Angeles Red Cross Chapter will be dedicated Sunday at 3 p.m.

Located on the southeast corner of First Street and Western Avenue, San Pedro, the 10,000-square foot, split level facility will also serve as the administrative headquarters for the Red Cross branches in San Pedro, Gardena, Palos Verdes, Torrance, Lomita, and Wilmington.

Presiding over the dedication ceremony will be Wendell C. B lack, president of Harbor Junior College and chairman of the Wilmington Red Cross Branch.

The dedication speech will be delivered by Daniel J. Haughton, president of the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation and vice chairman of the Los Angeles Red Cross Chapter.

There will be open house from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Open house will also be held from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the following Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

Denver Bullock, building committee chairman, said that the new headquarters will more than double the space of the present San Pedro Facility at 390 W. Seventh St.

"Ample space will be provided for blood collections, for classes in first aid and home nursing, and for meeting facilities," Bullock said. "And one suite will house three full-time social workers who give service to military families--the Red Cross service most often requested in the Southern District."

The $300,000 building will be dedicated to the memory of the late Mrs. John E. Yuncker, whose bequest paid more than two-thirds of the cost.

Mrs. Yuncker died on Dec. 2, 1962, just one month after her husband passed away. For many years the couple owned and operated the J. E. Yuncker Music Co., on West Seventh Street, Los Angeles. Mrs. Yuncker was an accomplished pianist.

Stressing that funds contributed to Red Cross during annual fund campaigns, such as the present United Crusade, are not used to purchase property and building, or pay for improvements, Bullock said that the remainder of the cost of the Southern District Service center was underwritten by other bequests and legacies, "or money donated expressly for this purpose."

When Jess Grindall, a San Pedro resident, saw the building going up, he donated $1,000 for some special kitchen equipment, Bullock said.

Others on the dedication program will be Juan Wynard, Red Cross Youth leader at Dodson Junior High School, who will lead the Pledge of Allegiance; the Rev. Harold Slusher, Christ Community Church, Gardena, who will give the invocation; the Army Color Guard from Ft. MacArthur, who will conduct the flag raising ceremony; and the Rev. Edward Couch, First Presbyterian Church, San Pedro, who will give the benediction.

The U. S. flag used in the ceremony has flown over the Capitol in Washington, D. C., and was the gift of Cecil R. King, U. S. Congressman, 17th District.

Footnotes
  1. Michigan, Michigan Births 1867-1902,; index and images, FamilySearch and Genealogical Society of Utah, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed); Department of Vital Records, Lansing, Michigan. [295], downloaded; 8 March 2015; image 368 of 803; John Yuncker; 16 February 1881.
  2. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.; Article; 12 December 1928; Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1928-87-23-SECTION-1-49.
  3. Ibid., John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.; Article; 12 December 1928; Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1928-87-23-SECTION-1-49.
  4. Ibid., John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.; Article; 12 December 1928; Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1928-87-23-SECTION-1-49.
  5. Ibid., John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.; Article; 12 December 1928; Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1928-87-23-SECTION-1-49.
  6. Los Angeles, California, Evening Herald; online archives, California Digital Newspaper Collection (http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc: accessed). [6], Classifieds: ONE of the oldest and most dignified; Classified; 13 May 1914; Page 18, Column 4; Downloaded; 11 August 2016.
  7. Ibid., Classifieds; Classified: Real Estate For Sale; 23 February 1915; Various ads, various dates Feb 23 through Apr 21, 1915; Downloaded; 1 July 2016.
  8. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Los Angeles Piano Trade Continues Very Active; Article; 9 September 1916; John E. Yuncker returns from vaction, Page 21; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1916-63-11-21.
  9. Southwest Contractor and Manufacturer, Volume 18, Number 17, Los Angeles, California, February 24, 1917, page 31. [358].
  10. Southwest Contractor and Manufacturer, Volume 18, Number 18, Los Angeles, California, March 3, 1917, page 21. [359].
  11. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Satisfactory Conditions Prevail in Los Angeles; Article; 17 September 1917; J. E. Yuncker in Auto Accident, Page 12; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1917-65-9-12.
  12. Los Angeles, California, Evening Herald; online archives, California Digital Newspaper Collection (http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc: accessed). [6], Melodious Tune of Chanticleer Attacked; Article; 3 June 1918; Page 1, Column 7; Page 6, Column 2; Downloaded; 3 July 2016.
  13. "United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed); citing. [81], downloaded; 11 March 2015; John Ernest Yuncker; Los Angeles City no 6, California, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,530,905.
  14. Ibid., downloaded; 11 March 2015; John Ernest Yuncker; Los Angeles City no 6, California, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,530,905.
  15. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Los Angeles Trade is Excellent Despite Shortage; Article; 15 February 1919; Best January Business in Four Years, Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1919-68-7-23.
  16. Ibid., San Francisco Dealers Preparing for Fall Business; Article; 26 July 1919; New Los Angeles Incorporation, Page 21; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; 1919-69-4-21.
  17. Ibid., Los Angeles Continues to be a Busy Trade Center; Article; 2 August 1919; Fitzgerald Music Co. Incorporates, Page 18; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1919-69-5-18.
  18. Los Angeles, California, Evening Herald; online archives, California Digital Newspaper Collection (http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc: accessed). [6], Charters Plane, Flies North to Keep Appointment; article; 1 September 1919; page 2, column 2; downloaded; 29 June 2016.
  19. Ibid., Fitzgerald Music Company; Advertisement; 4 September 1919; Page 6, John E. Yuncker pictured; downloaded; 29 June 2016.
  20. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Travels 200 Miles in Air to Close Ampico Sale; Article; 11 March 2015; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1919-69-12.
  21. "Piano Salesman Makes 'Plane Trip to Call on a Good Prospect," The Music Trades, Sep 20, 1919; online archives, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books?id=lptQAAAAYAAJ: accessed); Volume 58, 20 September 1919, Page 6. [75], downloaded; 5 August 2016.
  22. Los Angeles, California, Evening Herald; online archives, California Digital Newspaper Collection (http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc: accessed). [6], Music Co. Has Feast and Bonus Division; Article; 12 January 1921; Page A-11, Column 3; Downloaded; 30 June 2016.
  23. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Salesmanship Producing Results in Los Angeles; Article; 29 April 1922; Knabe President in Los Angeles, Page 27; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1922-74-17-27.
  24. Ibid., July Proves Excellent Month in Los Angeles Trade; Article; 12 August 1922; Fitzgerald's Sales Manager Robbed, Page 14; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1922-75-7-14.
  25. Presto or Presto-Times: The American Music Trade Weekly; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Presto. [15], "It Can Be Done" as Trade Slogan; Article; 25 August 1923; Page 6; Downloaded; 10 March 2015; PRESTO-1923-1935-06.
  26. Music Trade Review; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Music Trade Review. [9], Fred Colber Addreses Fitzgerald Organization; Article; 24 October 1925; Page 17; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1925-81-17-17.
  27. Ibid., Harry C. Braden Dies After Brief Illness; Article; 27 March 1926; Page 33; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1926-82-13-33.
  28. Ibid., Fitzgerald Music Co., Los Angeles, Holds Its Annual Piano Playing Contest; Article; 26 June 1926; Page 5; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1926-82-26-05.
  29. Ibid., Music Is Basis of Fitzgerald Advertising; Article; 8 January 1927; Page 5 and 20; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1927-84-2-SECTION-1-03.
  30. Ibid., John E. Yuncker Resigns From Fitzgerald Music Co.; Article; 12 December 1928; Page 23; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1928-87-23-SECTION-1-49.
  31. Ibid., Advertisement; Article; June 1930; J. E. Yuncker Music Co., Los Angeles, Calif., Page 24; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; MTR-1930-89-6-26.
  32. Presto or Presto-Times: The American Music Trade Weekly; online images, The International Arcade Museum (http://www.arcade-museum.com/: accessed), Projects, PDF: Presto. [15], What's Going On in the Trade; Article; November 1933–December 1933; Page 5; Downloaded; 11 August 2016; PRESTO-1933-2271-05.
  33. "United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed); citing. [82], downloaded; 11 March 2015; John Ernest Yuncker; NAID identifier 603155, NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 2,428,928.
  34. Ibid., downloaded; 11 March 2015; John Ernest Yuncker; NAID identifier 603155, NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 2,428,928.
  35. Flickr (https://www.flickr.com: accessed). [205], Downloaded; 15 February 2016; User photos, ThingsinBooks, https://www.flickr.com/photos/60799790@N05/with/9652001582/.
  36. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VGRN-NHS: accessed 20 April 2012), John E Yuncker (1962). [33].
  37. Jim Tipton, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com/: accessed). [258], downloaded ; 3 March 2015; John Yuncker 1881-1962, Bessie Yuncker 1888-1962, Memorials 6494703 and 6494704.
  38. "'It Can Be Done' as Trade Slogan: Fitzgerald Music Company, of Los Angeles, Proves that Summer Months May Be the Greatest of the Whole Year," Presto: The American Music Trade Weekly, August 25, 1923; online archives, The International Arcade Museum (http://presto.arcade-museum.com/PRESTO-1923-1935/: accessed). [30], downloaded; 11 March 2015; page 6.
  39. "Travels 200 Miles in Air to Close Ampico Sale," The Music Trade Review, Sep 20, 1919; online archives, The International Arcade Museum (http://mtr.arcade-museum.com/MTR-1919-69-12/: accessed). [78], downloaded; 11 March 2015; page 5.
  40. Jim Tipton, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com/: accessed). [258], downloaded ; 3 March 2015; John Yuncker 1881-1962, Bessie Yuncker 1888-1962, Memorials 6494703 and 6494704.
  41. Torrance (California) Press-Herald; online archives (http://www.torranceca.gov/libraryarchive/: accessed). [27], Red Cross Will Have New Center; article; 27 December 1964; downloaded; 13 February 2016; Major funding for a new American Red Cross Service Center was provided by a bequest from Bessie Yuncker.
  42. Ibid., Red Cross Will Dedicate Center; article; 27 October 1965; downloaded; 13 February 2016; Major funding for a new American Red Cross Service Center was provided by a bequest from Bessie Yuncker.
  43. Google, Inc., Google Street View (http://www.google.com: accessed). [228], Downloaded; 10 August 2016; 1499 West 1st Street in San Pedro, California.
  44. "British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed); citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B11375, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 1,983,703. [31], downloaded; 11 March 2015; John Ernest Yuncker and Bessie Zander, 6 August 1910.
divider

Citation: Mike Voisin, iSeeAncestors (http://iSeeAncestors.com/tree/groups/public/grp50060.html : revised April 26, 2017), John Ernest Yuncker & Bessie Zander.

Revised: April 26, 2017

Copyright © 2000-2017 Mike Voisin. All rights reserved.

Source: Mike Voisin   Website: http://iSeeAncestors.com   E-Mail: MikeVoisin@iSeeAncestors.com