The Voisin/Stewart Family
Bibliography
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The following sources were referenced during my research of the Voisin and Stewart families.

For recent generations, I surveyed the subject or the subject's parents to obtain birth and marriage dates. I have not verified this information with actual records. Information that is uncited, or cited from secondary sources, was obtained from other researchers. I am in the process of verifying this information using primary sources.

Please Note: I use a program named RootsMagic to maintain my family tree. Unfortunately it improperly exports source citations when I create a GEDCOM file, prior to generating these web pages with GED-GEN. Therefore my source citations and bibliography entries are worded strangely, but all information is present. Hopefully RootsMagic will correct this situation soon.

1.
Big Rapids [Michigan] Daily News; online archives (http://bigrapidsdailynews.com: accessed).
2.
Huron Daily Tribune; online archives (http://michigansthumb.com/: accessed).
3.
Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan; online archives (http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/: accessed).
4.
Local-area Newspaper, Mount Pleasant, Isabella Michigan.
5.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Online archives (http://www.jsonline.com/: accessed).
6.
Morning Sun; Online archives (http://www.themorningsun.com/: accessed).
7.
New York Times; online archives (http://www.nytimes.com/: accessed).
8.
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
9.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; online archives (http://post-gazette.com: accessed).
10.
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review; online archives (http://pittsburghlive.com/: accessed).
11.
The Daily Standard; Online Archives (http://www.dailystandard.com/: accessed).
12.
The Herald-News, Dayton, Tennessee; Online archives (http://rheaheraldnews.com/: accessed).
13.
The Indiana Gazette, Indiana, Pennsylvania; online (http://www.indianagazette.com: accessed).
14.
Traverse City Record-Eagle, Traverse City, Michigan; online archives (http://record-eagle.com/: accessed).
15.
Tribune-Review; online archives (http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/obituaries/: accessed).
16.
"California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VGPT-SCR: accessed 20 April 2012), Aaron B Downing (1993).
17.
"California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VGRN-NHS: accessed 20 April 2012), John E Yuncker (1962).
18.
"California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VPLM-92W: accessed 20 April 2012), Edward Albert Yuncker (1957).
19.
"Christmas letters to Jack and Ruth Voisin," Leo and Ella Voisin.
20.
"Christmas letters to Mike Voisin," Mike and Meg Elias.
21.
"Christmas letters to Mike Voisin," Tony and Kim Voisin.
22.
"Gase Baking Company Paystub," Estate of John E. Voisin, Huntsville, Madison, Alabama.
Reference: 000441
23.
"Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934," digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed).

[This database contains passenger lists of ships that departed from the port of Hamburg, Germany from 1850-1934 (with a gap from 1915-1919 due to World War I). The database includes images of the passenger lists digitized from microfilm in partnership with the Hamburg State Archive, available here for the first time online.

The database also includes a partial index, covering the years 1885-1914 (up to the start of WWI). This index is complete for the years it covers. The index was created by the Hamburg State Archive, using the original lists in their collection, as part of an ongoing project begun in 1999. The indexing project is mainly financed by the "Hauptf├╝rsorgestelle", an institution of the City of Hamburg that supports training programs for handicapped persons.

The Hamburg Passenger lists are a unique source for genealogical research as well as the study of the history of emigration and immigration. The lists include approximately 5 million records of individuals, approximately 80% of whom were destined for the United States. Ca. 475,000 traveled to South America, ca. 214,000 to Canada, ca. 100,000 to Africa, ca. 54,000 to Australia, and ca. 10,000 to Asian countries. Most of the lists include the last place of residence and often the place of birth as well. This makes them an enormously valuable source for family history research.

Approximately one third of the passengers who departed Hamburg were from Germany, while nearly two thirds came from Eastern Europe, especially in the period from 1880-1914. Among these were approximately 1.2 million people from Russia, Austria-Hungary, Romania, and other countries of southeastern Europe. The records also include about 750,000 Jewish immigrants from Russia, who sailed at this time from Hamburg to the United States.

From 1850-1854 the lists consisted merely of a roughly alphabetical registration, sometimes even with abbreviated first names, later including more detailed information. From 1854-1910, separate lists were maintained for direct passengers and indirect passengers. "Direct passengers" were those who arrived at their final destination upon the same ship that they were registered on when they departed Hamburg. These passengers may have had stopovers in other ports on their way to their final destination, but they remained on the same ship. "Indirect passengers" were those who were registered on one ship in Hamburg, but transferred to another ship before reaching their final destination. Transfers to other ships occurred mostly in English, French, Belgian, and Dutch ports, and usually had to do with reducing travel costs. From 1870 to 1892, one third or more of the passengers traveled via the indirect route, but later this declined to about 4%. From 1911 onward, the direct and indirect passengers were no longer recorded in separate lists.

Information contained in this database includes:

* Name of passenger
* Gender
* Age
* Birth date (or estimated birth year if birth date is not available)
* Birthplace
* Occupation
* Residence
* Nationality
* Marital status
* Relationship to head of family
* Religion
* Military Service
* Final place of destination
* Port of departure
* Date of departure
* Port of arrival
* Shipping Line
* Ship Type
* Accommodation
* Ship Name
* Which flag sailed under
* Source information (page, line, microfilm roll, and series numbers)

Not all of this information may be available for each individual as not all of the passenger list forms included all of these fields. Many of these items may be used to search the index for the years 1885-1914, using the search template above.]

24.
"Identity Record," Central Michigan Community Hospital, Mount Pleasant, Michigan.
Central Michigan Community Hospital [3]
Reference: 000609
25.
"Indiana County, Pennsylvania 1817 Whiteside Map," images, Carla A. Currie, Treasures of the Past (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~treasures/pa/indiana/maps/: accessed); citing Melish-Whiteside maps 1816-1821.
26.
"Indiana County, Pennsylvania 1856 Peelor Map," images, Carla A. Currie, Treasures of the Past (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~treasures/pa/indiana/maps/peelor1856/index.htm: accessed); citing Map of Indiana County Pennsylvania from actual surveys by David Peelor. Published by William J. Barker, North Hector, New York, 1856.
27.
"Knights of Columbus, The," Estate of John E. Voisin.
Reference: 001020
28.
"Letters to Mike Voisin,".
29.
"Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952," index, Family Search, FamilySearch (https//familysearch.org: accessed); citing Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.
30.
"Michigan, Deaths and Burials, 1800-1895," index, FamilySearch, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed); citing Index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City.
31.
"Nursery Visitor Pass," Central Michigan Community Hospital, Mount Pleasant, Michigan.
Central Michigan Community Hospital [3]
Reference: 000610
32.
"Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Baltimore, Maryland, 1891-1909," digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed).

[This database is an index to the passenger lists of ships arriving from foreign ports at the port of Baltimore, Maryland from 1820-1948. In addition, the names found in the index are linked to actual images of the passenger lists, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm M255, rolls 1-50 and microfilm T844, rolls 1-150. This database also contains a few records of immigrants who entered the U.S. at other ports or border crossings and were later asked, when they were living in Baltimore, to fill out immigrant arrival information on passenger lists. Therefore, you may find individuals in this database whose port of arrivals are, for example, St. Albans, Vermont; Portal, North Dakota; Port Huron, Michigan; Tampa, Florida; and others.

Information contained in the index includes:

* Name
* Age
* Gender
* Ethnicity, nationality or last country of permanent residence
* Destination
* Arrival date
* Port of arrival
* Port of departure
* Ship name
* Microfilm roll and page number

If a name of a friend or relative whom the individual was going to join with, or a place of nativity was provided, that information is included in the index as well. Many of these items may be used to search the index in the search template above.

Many passenger list forms, especially those from the twentieth century, were two pages long. Be sure to click the "Previous" and "Next" buttons in order to see all the images pertaining to a particular manifest.

It is important to note that the port of departure listed on these passenger lists is not always the original port of departure for these individuals. A ship could make several voyages throughout the year, making several stops along way. Oft times the port of departure found on these lists is the most recent port the ship was located at prior to arriving at the port of Baltimore. Therefore, if your ancestors emigrated to the U.S. from Germany, they could be found on a passenger list coming from Liverpool, England (if, in this case, the ship left from Bremen, Germany then continued on to Liverpool, England before arriving in Baltimore).

The microcopies of the passenger lists found at NARA are arranged chronologically by arrival date of vessel. If you do not wish to search this database using the search template, the images may be browsed following the chronological arrangement. To browse the images first select the "Year" in which you would like to search, followed by the "Month", and finally the "Ship Name".

To learn about researching in passenger records consult John P. Colletta's book, They Came In Ships (Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993).]

33.
"Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1883-1945," digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed).

[This database is an index to the passenger lists of ships arriving from foreign ports at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 1800-1945. In addition, the names found in the index are linked to actual images of the passenger lists, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm M425, rolls 1-108 and microfilm T840, rolls 1-181.

Information contained in the index includes:

* Name
* Age
* Gender
* Ethnicity, nationality or last country of permanent residence
* Destination
* Arrival date
* Port of arrival
* Port of departure
* Ship name
* Microfilm roll and page number

Other listed information may include the name of a friend or relative whom the individual was going to join or a place of nativity. Many of these items may be used to search the index in the search template above.

Many passenger list forms, especially those from the twentieth century, were two pages long. Be sure to click the "Previous" and "Next" buttons in order to see all the images pertaining to a particular manifest.

It is important to note that the port of departure listed on these passenger lists is not always the original port of departure for these individuals. A ship could make several voyages throughout the year, making several stops along way. Oft times the port of departure found on these lists is the most recent port the ship was located at prior to arriving at the port of Philadelphia. Therefore, if your ancestors immigrated to the United States from Germany, they could be found on a passenger list coming from Liverpool, England (if, in this case, the ship left from Bremen, Germany, then continued on to Liverpool, England, before arriving in Philadelphia).

The microcopies of the passenger lists found at NARA are arranged chronologically by arrival date of vessel. If you do not wish to search this database using the search template, the images may be browsed following the chronological arrangement. To browse the images first select the "Year" in which you would like to search, followed by the "Month," and finally the "Ship Name..

To learn about researching in passenger records consult John P. Colletta, They Came In Ships (Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993).]

34.
"Passenger Lists," digital image, Ellis Island Foundation (http://www.ellisisland.org/: accessed).
35.
"Photographs," Andrea Jablonski, Bremen, Germany.
36.
"Photographs," Betty-Jane Lee, Boynton Beach, Florida.
37.
"Photographs," Debra (Sweeney) Campbell, Redlands, California.
Mike Voisin [12]
38.
"Photographs," Estate of Evelyn Mary (Rademacher) Earl, Heather Justice.
Heather Justice [7]
39.
"Photographs," Estate of Harold Joseph Voisin, Bay City, Michigan.
40.
"Photographs," Estate of John Ernest Voisin, Huntsville, Madison, Alabama.
Mike Voisin [12]
41.
"Photographs," Estate of Ruth Phyllis Voisin, Huntsville, Madison, Alabama.
Mike Voisin [12]
42.
"Photographs," Glenn Arthur Voisin, Sagninaw, Michigan.
43.
"Photographs," Irene (Blasen) Smith, Lansing, Ingham, Michigan.
44.
"Photographs," John M. Voisin, Huntsville, Madison, Alabama.
Mike Voisin [12]
45.
"Photographs," Mary Lou (Voisin) Elias, Okemos, Michigan.
46.
"Photographs," Paul James Voisin, Saint Johns, Michigan.
47.
"Social Security Death Index," database, Ancestry.com, Rootsweb (http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/: accessed); citing United States Social Security Administration.
48.
"State and County Maps: Pennsylvania: County Maps and Atlases," map images, USGenWeb Archives, United States Digital Map Library (http://www.usgwarchives.org/maps/pa/county/: accessed); citing Atlas of Indiana County Pennsylvania, (New York: F.W. Beers & Co., 1871).
49.
"World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," digital image, MyFamily.com, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed); citing United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918: Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls.
50.
"WPA Property Inventories," database, Michigan History Foundation, Seeking Michigan (http://seekingmichigan.org: accessed); citing Michigan Department of Treasury; Works Progress Administration.

["During the Great Depression, the Michigan Department of Treasury collaborated with the Works Progress Administration to undertake an extensive survey of nearly all land parcels in the state (excluding Wayne County). The survey served two purposes: it provided jobs for unemployed engineers, land surveyors, and appraisers while giving the state a basis for assessing property taxes. The project started late in 1935 and continued until 1942."]

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Citation: Mike Voisin, iSeeAncestors (http://iSeeAncestors.com/tree/groups/public/grpbib1.html : revised October 29, 2013), Bibliography.

Revised: October 29, 2013

Copyright © 2000-2013 Mike Voisin. All rights reserved.

Source: Mike Voisin   Website: http://iSeeAncestors.com   E-Mail: MikeVoisin@iSeeAncestors.com